Top 10 Best Underground Wonders

Top 10 Best Underground Wonders

Our planet Earth has so many beautiful natural wonders. Some of them are laid in front of our eyes, while others are secretly hidden underneath. Check out our list of these incredible underground gems, that provide an unforgettable experience.

10. Wieliczka Salt Mine, Wieliczka, Poland

The salt mine operates since the 13th century. Today it is set as a museum: over 1.2 million tourists visit the site due to its underground attractions. There is an underground lake, wellness complex, many salt sculptures and even a carved cathedral – all made of salt!

How to get there?

It is located only 10 km from the beautiful old city of Krakow. Get there by bus, train or car, taking E40 route.

Top 10 Underground-Wieliczka-Photo by William H.

Photo by William H.

Top 10 Underground-Wieliczka-Photo by Redstone Hill

Photo by Redstone Hill

Top 10 Underground-Wieliczka-Photo by Michal Osmenda

Photo by Michal Osmenda

9. Salt Mines in Yekaterinburg, Russia

A psychedelic walls of layers of carnallite are found underneath the industrial city. The vivid spectacle of colorful minerals is found 200 m (650 ft) under the surface. However it is not open to visit, unless with a permit from the government.

How to get there?

Get to Yekaterinburg’s international airport from various European cities or Dubai, Tel Aviv, Istanbul, Tashkent.

Top 10 Underground-Salt Mine-Photo by Mikhail Mishainik (1)

Photo by Mikhail Mishainik

Top 10 Underground-Salt Mine-Photo by Mikhail Mishainik (6)

Photo by Mikhail Mishainik

Top 10 Underground-Salt Mine-Photo by Mikhail Mishainik (2)

Photo by Mikhail Mishainik

8. Bounce Below, Wales, UK

Located in the Llechwedd caverns, the facility provides the most exciting bounce experience ever! The three giant trampolines are found in a 176-year old disused mining cavern. The world’s first subterranean playground is lit by the colorful lights, making it even more compelling.

How to get there?

Bounce Below is found in Antur Stiniog, Gwynedd. Get there by train from various British cities.

Top 10 Underground-Bounce Below (2)

Photo by Bounce Below

Top 10 Underground-Bounce Below (6)

Photo by Bounce Below

Top 10 Underground-Bounce Below (7)

Photo by Bounce Below

7. Derinkuyu Underground City, Cappadocia, Turkey

Carved into soft volcanic rock in the 8th–7th centuries B.C. by the Phrygians, the city used to serve as a shelter from invasions. The city is 60 meters deep and is interconnected by the tunnels. It could house over 20,000 people! Today most of it is open for the tourists.

How to get there?

The tours take off from Goreme – a town in Cappadocia.

Top 10 Underground-Derinkuyu-Photo by Ryan Opaz

Photo by Ryan Opaz

Top 10 Underground-Derinkuyu (2)

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Derinkuyu (1)

Photo by Unknown

6. Cenotes, Mexico

The deep natural sinkholes are very often found in Mexico. Some, like in Chichén Itzá and Valladolid, are especially beautiful and popular among the tourists. Sacred Cenotes used to be visited by the pilgrims, who would sacrifice objects and sometimes even humans.

How to get there?

Choose your favorite destination and get there by bus or a guided tour from various cities in Mexico.

Top 10 Underground-Cenote-Photo by Jack Paulus

Photo by Jack Paulus

Top 10 Underground-Cenote (2)

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Cenote (1)

Photo by Unknown

5. Booming Ice Chasm, Canadian Rockies, Canada

A dangerous cave traps cold air that enters it, but doesn’t leave, resulting in several meters of thick clear smooth ice. It also has an amazing acoustics. However, only professionals should climb these ice caves, though, because the slightest mistake would send them sliding into the wall.

How to get there?

Situated on the Alberta/British Columbia border, which is a 90 minutes drive from Calgary.

Top 10 Underground-Canada-Photo by Michael Anderson

Photo by Michael Anderson

Top 10 Underground-Canada (1)

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Canada (2)

Photo by Unknown

4. Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico, USA

Found in the Guadalupe Mountains, caverns feature huge limestone chambers. Limestone and stalactites are found all over the caves. In the spotlight they reflect various colors and transfer visitors to the different, magic world for a while.

How to get there?

It is located 40 km (25 mi) from Carlsbad. Get there by car via US Highways 62 and 180 or bus.

Top 10 Underground-Carlsbad (1)

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Carlsbad (2)

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Carlsbad

Photo by Unknown

3. Stockholm Metro Station, Stockholm, Sweden

Unofficially known as the „world’s longest art gallery“, the metro station has some exciting paintings. The colorful rugged surface of the walls and ceiling gives a surreal impression of a space on fire. The initial idea to bring art to public by using the public space worked out really well.

How to get there?

Easy access from anywhere in Stockholm.

2. Batu Caves, Gombak, Malaysia

The popular limestone hill has many caves and is a sacred spot, visited by the locals as well as tourists. The temple complex is spread all over the hill. The underground caverns feature stunning limestone formations and rare animal species.

How to get there?

The site is only 13 km (8 mi) north of Kuala Lumpur. The train route to the caves is said to be beautiful.

Top 10 Underground-Batu-Photo by Danny Xeero

Photo by Danny Xeero

Top 10 Underground-Batu

Photo by Unknown

1. The Waitomo Caves, King Country, New Zealand

The Waitomo Caves system is over 2 million years old. There are spectacular limestone caves, but the Glowworm Caves are the most stunning: Arachnocampa luminosa, the size of a mosquito and found only in New Zealand and Australia, radiate in a dark and create the unique sight.

How to get there?

The caves are 2 hours from Auckland, 1 hour from Hamilton and 2 hours from Rotorua.

Top 10 Underground-Waitomo (1)

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Waitomo

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Waitomo (2)

Photo by Unknown

Top 10 Underground-Waitomo-Photo by Ian Cossor

Photo by Ian Cossor